[VIDEO] Introducing the Mobilise-D Clinical Trials

One of the many impacts of the COVID-19 lockdown earlier this year, has been the severe restrictions on mobility of both patients and the public. Furthermore, the ability to assess patients’ mobility has suffered as well because of the barriers created between researchers and participants. Being able to remotely monitor patients’ mobility in their natural…

New paper on gait tests in the hospital and at home in Parkinson’s Disease

The gait of patients with Parkinson’s Disease is typically assessed in a laboratory but with current developments in sensor technology, their gait could be assessed in the home environment as well. But how comparable are these two? Researchers from University Hospital Erlangen studied this question. In a reliability analysis, they compared standardized and supervised sensor-based…

Mobilise-D well represented at the Virtual Physiological Human Conference 2020

The Virtual Physiological Human Conference (VPH2020) was held online August 24-28 with several representatives from the Mobilise-D consortium. This year, the focus was on “When models, methods & experiments meet the clinic”. Prof. Claudia Mazzà from the University of Sheffield, Mobilise-D’s Academic Lead of WP2 – Algorithm development and technical validation, chaired the session “Monitoring &…

Protocol paper for Mobilise-D scoping review published

Walking limitations are debilitating symptoms in many chronic diseases, and are highly related to quality of life, fall risk, and economic burden. Unsurprisingly, walking ability is a common target of pharmacological or behavioural intervention. Thanks to advances in wearable sensor technologies, it is now possible to objectively monitor how, and how much, patients walk in…

VIDEO: Mobilise-D matters – now more than ever!

The large-scale social and behavioural changes that happened almost overnight in our day-to-day life due to COVID-19, illustrate the importance of anticipating and developing new ways of patient care. Especially mobility is a telling sign of how well a patient is doing. “Mobility is something that we take for granted until we lose it. And…

Walking in the lab and a real-world environment with Multiple Sclerosis

Our colleagues from Tel Aviv, the TASMC Mobilisers, studied the quality of walking of people with multiple sclerosis and healthy controls in two environments: a) a well-structured laboratory setting and b) during real-life, everyday walking using 24/7 monitoring.  During every-day walking, the patients took fewer steps, they walked more slowly, and the quality of their…